Hydrangea Blue Wave

Another Morrisons Plant which has been a lovely addition to the garden underneath the arch. Bought 6th June 2013 as shown.

Photos at Time of Purchase

Hydrangea Blue Wave

Hydrangea Blue Wave

Background

Hydrangea can be deciduous or evergreen shrubs, or self-clinging climbers, with flowers in clusters usually comprising both small fertile and more showy sterile flowers; often good autumn colour. Other common names hydrangea ‘Mariesii Perfecta’.

Hydrangeas give their best blue flowers on acidic soils with a pH 5.5. When grown on neutral soil, (with a pH of 7), the flowers will predominantly be pink, although you may also get blue or mauve blooms. If you want to make sure that your Hydrangea has blue-toned flowers, you will need to make sure your pH does not creep above 6.5. To lower the pH on a neutral soil, you can treat it annually with aluminium salts. It’s much harder however to alter the pH of limey (alkaline) soil, so it’s much easier to grow white or pink hydrangeas instead.

  • Eventual Height: 2m
  • Eventual Spread: 2.5m

Where I planted

Planted to the left of an arch in the ground.

Other Photos

hydrangea
5th June 2014
hydrangea
5th June 2014
hydrangea
3rd July 2014
hydrangea
25th July 2014

Further Info

General info here: RHS and Telegraph and Gardeners World

Things to Remember

  • Possibly watering with hard tap water might make them go Pink.
  • Hydrangeas do not like to dry out. In dry weather, soak the roots with a hose and the plant will usually recover.
  • Remove faded flowerheads in spring after the danger of frosts, cutting back the flowered stems to a strong pair of buds.
  • Take out misplaced or diseased shoots.
  • Mulch young plants with a well-rotted manure or compost in spring.
  • Once established, remove a quarter to a third of the shoots to the base of the plant.
  • It makes an excellent cut flower.

The Acer Palmatum

Four Acer Trees bought from Morrisons Flower shop around 27th April 2014. Two Red and two Green – lets see how they grow! Initially planted in a a small square plot as shown.

  • 2x Acer Palmatum Atropurpureum
  • 2 x Acer Palmatum Orange Dream
Acer
25th July 2014
Acer
25th July 2014
Acer
25th July 2014

Photos at Time of Purchase

27th April 2014

Acer

Acer

Acer

Acer

Acer Acer

Background

Acer can be deciduous trees or large shrubs with paired, often palmately-lobed leaves and small flowers followed by characteristic winged fruits. Many have fine autumn colour, and some have ornamental stems.

‘Atropurpureum’ is a small tree of bushy habit, with deep purple leaves divided into about 7 lobes, and becoming red in autumn. Inconspicuous red-purple flowers in spring may be followed by winged, purple fruits.

‘Orange dream’ is masses of tiny, red, spring flowers contrasting beautifully against beautiful orange-green leaves. This bushy, spreading Japanese maple is an ideal specimen tree for a small garden or perfect for a large container, its elegant, open shape looks especially good silhouetted next to buildings.

Where I planted

Planted to the left next to the Cordyline.

 

Acer
25th July 2014

Further Info

Some Info from RHS here and here.

Things to Remember

  • Add a top dressing of a multi-purpose fertiliser around the base of the plant in late spring.
  • No routine pruning is required.
  • Like other Japanese maples, it needs a sunny or partially shaded spot which is protected from cold winds.
  • It is suitable for growing in a large container, using John Innes No 3 compost, but must be kept well-watered.
  • Likes a sandy humus rich soil
  • Feed with general purpose fertilizer during the growing season

Love of Sweet Peas

I first came across these flowers when seeing another gardener buying some plants at B&Q (May 2013) – and I asked him what to grow and he mentioned Sweet Peas. What a joy these flowers are – and long lasting if you keep removing the seeds. I subsequently bought them from B&Q and planted. Then came a Love of Sweet Peas.

Sweet Peas Geranium

Sweet Peas Summer Scent Mix

Sweet-Peas-Elizabeth-Tailor

Swett Peas Tray

The following year I decided to try from seed and had great success. The below Sweet Peas were bought in April and the photos were taken in July.

Sweet Peas 1

Sweet Peas 2

Sweet Peas 3

Sweet Peas 7

Sweet Peas 4

Sweet Peas 5

More Info

Things to Remember

  • You can sew them in Autumn as well as Spring
  • Before you sew them you can put the seeds in tepid water overnight
  • In a 10cm pot you can put 5 seeds
  • Once produces first side shoots you can cut of just above those leaves to produce a bushier & robust plant with more flowers
  • Once your sweet peas are growing well and the main risk of frost has passed, you can pop them outside to acclimatise them to outdoor conditions for a week or so before planting them out.
  • Keep them well watered as dry soil can make them go to seed much quicker
  • The more you cut off flowers the more flowers will be produced
  • Remove any faded flowers or seed pods as soon as possible to encourage more blooms to be produced